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Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

Where is the discussion around the environment and sustainability?

The Globe and Mail is challenging Canadians to start some critical dialogue, in the hopes that these discussions will provide a better sense of how to define ourselves as a nation. Here is a blurb from John Stackhouse, the Editor-in-Chief of the Globe and Mail:

About Canada: Our Time To Lead

On Oct. 1, The Globe and Mail revealed a new look. This change coincides with the launch of a discussion that begins in our pages, but ultimately lives beyond them.

We hope, and intend, for this discussion to strike at the heart of how Canadians define ourselves, and our nation. It is meant to go beyond words. We hope it will become a turning point.

We need to re-examine Canadian institutions, and conceits, that we hold dear. Instead of locking ourselves in celebrations of the past, we want to explore our future — and all we can do to make it brilliant.

But what really can eight discussions over two months achieve? We hope they ignite a million great Canadian debates, at breakfast tables and board tables.

Start with The Globe and Mail. From there, it’s up to you.

Canada, it’s our time to lead.

Specifically, The Globe and Mail selected 8 topics for discussion that they feel are of prime importance to Canadians. These topics include: Multiculturalism, Women in Power, Failing Boys, Military, Work-Life, Health Care, Internet, and Food.

What I Like About This:

  1. Sparking debate and discussion – For the people who actually do read The Globe and Mail, I feel that these are topics that will spark a lot of discussion among Canadians. The 8 topics have many sub-issues that are important to critically analyse: ‘are we medicating a disorder, or treating boyhood as a disease?’ (the medication of children for ADHD); integrating multiculturalism into practice; whether to send Canadian military troops to the Congo; the effects of work stress on our lives, and consequently on the health care system; and the safety and traceability of our food.

What I Don’t Like About This:

  1. Ignores other important issues – One thing that really irked me about this is the assumption that the only concern addressing Canadian women, is that there are still relatively few female CEO’s. The Women in Power section begins with a piece entitled “Why the Executive Suite is the Final Frontier for Women”. Really? So women have equal rights and equal access to services and resources across Canada to men, EXCEPT in the business world? This section should have addressed the myriad of concerns that Canadian women face: poverty, access to health services, sexual violence, childcare, young girls and body image…
  2. Ask Canadians – Get out on the streets and ask Canadians what’s up! Granted, there will be many people who do not know about all the issues, so maybe hold free public speaks where people can become informed of the issues. Go to schools and present these issues to youths, and explain how they can get involved.
  3. Put it into action – Nowhere does it state that The Globe and Mail will be transforming these ever-so-important discussions into action. Why not write a policy paper and address these concerns to the Canadian government? If these issues are so important, why not do more about them than simply writing articles?

Do any of these issues stand out for you? Applause? Criticism?

What issue do you believe that Canadians need to discuss?

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